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Mapogo lion coalition
ww FF
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The Mapogo lion coalition was a band of male
South African lions that controlled the Sabi Sand region in Kruger National Park. The coalition became infamous for their sheer power and strength in taking over and dominating an area of approximately
70,000 ha (170,000 acres). It is believed the
Mapogos killed in excess of 100 lions and cubs ina little over a year. The statistics may be higher given their coverage of such large territories.'") At its peak, the coalition consisted of six males - the leader
Makulu (also spelled as Rasta, Scar,
Pretty Boy, Kinky Tail and Mr.
Mapogo lion coalition ww FF @ This article needs additional citations for verification. Learn more The Mapogo lion coalition was a band of male South African lions that controlled the Sabi Sand region in Kruger National Park. The coalition became infamous for their sheer power and strength in taking over and dominating an area of approximately 70,000 ha (170,000 acres). It is believed the Mapogos killed in excess of 100 lions and cubs ina little over a year. The statistics may be higher given their coverage of such large territories.'") At its peak, the coalition consisted of six males - the leader Makulu (also spelled as Rasta, Scar, Pretty Boy, Kinky Tail and Mr.
(CNN) - Swinging above the African savannah, an upside-down rhino suspended from a helicopter looks comically surreal. But for the black rhino, flying to new territory is no laughing matter
{t's about survival.
Most rhino translocations are carried out with trucks, but Some remote locations can't be reached by road. So ten years ago, conservationists began using helicopters, on an occasional basis, to move rhinos to and from inaccessible terrain. The rhino is either placed on its side on a stretcher, or hung upside down by its legs.
(CNN) - Swinging above the African savannah, an upside-down rhino suspended from a helicopter looks comically surreal. But for the black rhino, flying to new territory is no laughing matter {t's about survival. Most rhino translocations are carried out with trucks, but Some remote locations can't be reached by road. So ten years ago, conservationists began using helicopters, on an occasional basis, to move rhinos to and from inaccessible terrain. The rhino is either placed on its side on a stretcher, or hung upside down by its legs.