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Cats can transmit COVID-19-causing virus to other cats: Study
A study in The New England Journal of
Medicine said cats are capable of transmitting causing virus to other cats.
Researchers infected three cats with large doses of virus and housed them in pairs with uninfected cats. Within five days, uninfected cats tested positive for SARS CoV in
nasal swabs. None of the cats showed any
symptoms at any time. You Think \t's True
Follow Cat Memes (Facebook Page) Cats can transmit COVID-19-causing virus to other cats: Study A study in The New England Journal of Medicine said cats are capable of transmitting causing virus to other cats. Researchers infected three cats with large doses of virus and housed them in pairs with uninfected cats. Within five days, uninfected cats tested positive for SARS CoV in nasal swabs. None of the cats showed any symptoms at any time. You Think \t's True
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todayllearned
ufSeizeOppurtunity
32
TIL: Researchers taught African grey parrots to buy food using tokens. They were then paired up, one parrot given ten tokens and the other none. Without any incentive for sharing, parrots with tokens started to give some to their broke partners so that everyone could eat.
smithsont
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al todayllearned ufSeizeOppurtunity 32 TIL: Researchers taught African grey parrots to buy food using tokens. They were then paired up, one parrot given ten tokens and the other none. Without any incentive for sharing, parrots with tokens started to give some to their broke partners so that everyone could eat. smithsont 57.5k 2.1k it Share Award s7skyy =O) PROMOTED uffanduel SWISH! Nothing but risk free betting! Get in on the action on the Fanduel app tod< Add a comment
flowerfistandbestialwail
In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of
Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.
The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat.
The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy - and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.
"A New Model of Empathy: The Rat" by David Brown,
Washinoton Post
flowerfistandbestialwail In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes. The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat. The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy - and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state. "A New Model of Empathy: The Rat" by David Brown, Washinoton Post
When a vampire bat died just 19 days after giving birth, another female bat adopted the orphan. Researchers documented the unusual relationship in a new paper in the
journal Royal Society Open Science,
As part of a study on cooperative relationships, researchers combined three groups of wild-caught common vampire bats into one captive colony at the
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama. They noticed that two unfamiliar and unrelated female bats slowly formed a social relationship. The researchers named them Lilith and IBID.
When a vampire bat died just 19 days after giving birth, another female bat adopted the orphan. Researchers documented the unusual relationship in a new paper in the journal Royal Society Open Science, As part of a study on cooperative relationships, researchers combined three groups of wild-caught common vampire bats into one captive colony at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama. They noticed that two unfamiliar and unrelated female bats slowly formed a social relationship. The researchers named them Lilith and IBID.
#9 Rats Are Very Empathetic
BB flowerfistandbestiatwall
In a simple experiment, researchers at the
University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.
The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it.
Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat.
Pinterest
#9 Rats Are Very Empathetic BB flowerfistandbestiatwall In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes. The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat.
#9 Rats Are Very Empathetic
In a simple experiment, researchers at the
University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.
The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it.
Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat.
Pinterest
#9 Rats Are Very Empathetic In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes. The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat.
This is Lonesome George, the last Pinta
Island tortoise. Researchers tried to mate him with closely related tortoise species but,
"He probably never saw a female and male of his own species reproducing."
Pinterest
This is Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island tortoise. Researchers tried to mate him with closely related tortoise species but, "He probably never saw a female and male of his own species reproducing."
flowerfistandbestialwail
In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of
Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.
The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chacolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat.
The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy - and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.
"A New Model of Empathy: The Rat" by David Brown,
Washinoton Post
awfulAnimalsawfulAnimals
1 feb
Pinterest
flowerfistandbestialwail In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes. The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn't the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chacolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive - which is a lot to expect of a rat. The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy - and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state. "A New Model of Empathy: The Rat" by David Brown, Washinoton Post
Volgen
TIL photographers are a lot like puffins, cuz we also make friends by showing interest in your
camera XD
Volgen
Reminds me of the time researchers were trying to get puffins to land in a specific area so the put decoys up to draw them in but the decoys only had leg and
legally-a-bastard Volgen
thin tea an fiinvinan
Volgen TIL photographers are a lot like puffins, cuz we also make friends by showing interest in your camera XD Volgen Reminds me of the time researchers were trying to get puffins to land in a specific area so the put decoys up to draw them in but the decoys only had leg and legally-a-bastard Volgen thin tea an fiinvinan