#octopuses memes

13 results found
Octopuses can fit through any gap larger than their beak.
Story one:
therebloggening
What a beautiful octopus.
Octopuses can fit through any gap larger than their beak. Story one: therebloggening What a beautiful octopus.
Erik Wade
love how every single study about octopuses is just completely wild.
Octopuses on ecstasy just want cuddle
Erik Wade love how every single study about octopuses is just completely wild. Octopuses on ecstasy just want cuddle
Abbie Cheeseman
@cheesemanab
Scientists have discovered that, on occasions,
an octopus will "punch" a fish for no reason other than "spite"
Octopuses are ocean thugs that punch fish
thetimes.co.uk
AM 23 Dec 20 from Wales, United Kingdom Twitter for iPhone
2,914 Retweeis 1,958 Quote Tweeis 12.7K Likes
Abbie Cheeseman @cheesemanab Scientists have discovered that, on occasions, an octopus will "punch" a fish for no reason other than "spite" Octopuses are ocean thugs that punch fish thetimes.co.uk AM 23 Dec 20 from Wales, United Kingdom Twitter for iPhone 2,914 Retweeis 1,958 Quote Tweeis 12.7K Likes
(Sampaio et al, Ecology, 2020)
NATURE
Octopuses Observed
Punching Fish, Perhaps
Out of Spite, Scientists
Say
PETER DOCKRILL
21 DECEMBER 2020
In new proof that 2020 has been a crappy year basically everywhere, scientists have captured video evidence of octopuses randomly punching at fish, possibly for no reason other than being spiteful.
(Sampaio et al, Ecology, 2020) NATURE Octopuses Observed Punching Fish, Perhaps Out of Spite, Scientists Say PETER DOCKRILL 21 DECEMBER 2020 In new proof that 2020 has been a crappy year basically everywhere, scientists have captured video evidence of octopuses randomly punching at fish, possibly for no reason other than being spiteful.
Like humans, octopuses become more sociable and engaged after a dose of the party drug MDMA.
In the human brain, MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy, triggers the release of the neurotransmitter serotonin, causing feelings of happiness and closeness to others. The California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) has a serotonin transport system similar to that of humans. To determine whether this system serves the same function in octopuses and humans, Eric
Edsinger at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods
Hole, Massachusetts, and Gil Ddlen at Johns Hopkins
University in Baltimore, Maryland, submerged five octopuses in MDMA-laced water and tested their behaviour around others of their kind.
After absorbing the drug, the animals ignored toys, such as Star Wars figurines, that would normally have intrigued them. Instead, the octopuses socialized and spent more time touching one another with their arms than these creatures usually do.
The findings suggest that serotonin played an important part in social behaviour in the common ancestor of octopuses and vertebrates, whose branches on the family tree separated more than 500 million years ago.
Curr. Biol. (2018)
Neuroscience
watchful_an1malswatchful_an1mals
17 sep 2020
Pinterest
Like humans, octopuses become more sociable and engaged after a dose of the party drug MDMA. In the human brain, MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy, triggers the release of the neurotransmitter serotonin, causing feelings of happiness and closeness to others. The California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) has a serotonin transport system similar to that of humans. To determine whether this system serves the same function in octopuses and humans, Eric Edsinger at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and Gil Ddlen at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, submerged five octopuses in MDMA-laced water and tested their behaviour around others of their kind. After absorbing the drug, the animals ignored toys, such as Star Wars figurines, that would normally have intrigued them. Instead, the octopuses socialized and spent more time touching one another with their arms than these creatures usually do. The findings suggest that serotonin played an important part in social behaviour in the common ancestor of octopuses and vertebrates, whose branches on the family tree separated more than 500 million years ago. Curr. Biol. (2018) Neuroscience
octopuses
salty_animalssalty_animals
19 may 2020
Pinterest