#authors memes

6 results found
The author of this Math textbook casually throws in pictures of his cat
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Using newly digitised logbooks detailing the hunting of sperm whales in the north
Pacific, the authors discovered that within just a few years, the strike rate of the whalers' harpoons fell by 58%. This simple fact leads to an astonishing conclusion: that information about what was happening to them was being collectively shared among the whales, who made vital changes to their behaviour. As their culture made fatal first contact with ours, they learned quickly from their mistakes.
"Sperm whales have a traditional way of reacting to attacks from orca," notes Hal
Whitehead, who spoke to the Guardian from his house overlooking the ocean in
Dalhousie, Nova Scotia, where he teaches.
Before humans, orca were their only predators, against whom sperm whales form defensive circles, their powerful tails held outwards to keep their assailants at bay. But such techniques "just made it easier for the whalers to slaughter them", says Whitehead.
Pinterest
Using newly digitised logbooks detailing the hunting of sperm whales in the north Pacific, the authors discovered that within just a few years, the strike rate of the whalers' harpoons fell by 58%. This simple fact leads to an astonishing conclusion: that information about what was happening to them was being collectively shared among the whales, who made vital changes to their behaviour. As their culture made fatal first contact with ours, they learned quickly from their mistakes. "Sperm whales have a traditional way of reacting to attacks from orca," notes Hal Whitehead, who spoke to the Guardian from his house overlooking the ocean in Dalhousie, Nova Scotia, where he teaches. Before humans, orca were their only predators, against whom sperm whales form defensive circles, their powerful tails held outwards to keep their assailants at bay. But such techniques "just made it easier for the whalers to slaughter them", says Whitehead.
42sky42 said
My English teacher says we shouldn't refer to authors by their first names because they aren't our friends. Will you confirm our friendship and let me call you Neil on my American Gods book report?
Absolutely.
42sky42 said My English teacher says we shouldn't refer to authors by their first names because they aren't our friends. Will you confirm our friendship and let me call you Neil on my American Gods book report? Absolutely.
42sky42 said
My English teacher says we shouldn't refer to authors by their first names because they aren't our friends. Will you confirm our friendship and let me call you Neil on my American Gods book report?
Absolutely.
42sky42 said My English teacher says we shouldn't refer to authors by their first names because they aren't our friends. Will you confirm our friendship and let me call you Neil on my American Gods book report? Absolutely.