Iceberg A-68a originally broke off of
Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf on July
12, 2017. At the time, it measured more than 2,300 square miles (6,000 square kilometers) - large enough to hold the five boroughs of New York
City five times over. Despite its impressive surface area, the berg was incredibly thin, and it began losing large chunks of ice beginning in April
2020.
In late 2020, the berg appeared to be on a collision course with South
Georgia island (a British overseas territory). Researchers feared that the berg would make landfall near the island, cutting off the feeding routes for thousands of seals, penguins and other animal residents of South
Georgia and potentially leading to widespread famine.
Iceberg A-68a originally broke off of Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf on July 12, 2017. At the time, it measured more than 2,300 square miles (6,000 square kilometers) - large enough to hold the five boroughs of New York City five times over. Despite its impressive surface area, the berg was incredibly thin, and it began losing large chunks of ice beginning in April 2020. In late 2020, the berg appeared to be on a collision course with South Georgia island (a British overseas territory). Researchers feared that the berg would make landfall near the island, cutting off the feeding routes for thousands of seals, penguins and other animal residents of South Georgia and potentially leading to widespread famine.